Social Work Major

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Courses

Visit the Online Undergraduate Catalog for an explanation of graduation requirements.

The social work major requires completion of 42 credits. Students completing the social work major are eligible for the bachelor of science degree. 

Field education is an integral part of the Social Work curriculum, providing you the opportunity to apply what you learn in the classroom and work under the supervision of a seasoned social worker. Community agencies and other work environments act as learning laboratories, giving students valuable exposure to the full range of functions, responsibilities, challenges, and opportunities today’s social worker's experience.

All students must complete 400 hours of hands on training.

All practicums and field sites must be approved by the Field Education office and you are expected to comply with the policies and procedures of the department as noted in the Field Education Manual.

Field Instructors:

Students:

Social Work Major Courses

This course introduces psychology as a science and emphasizes the interaction of social, cognitive, emotional, motivational, and organizational approaches to understanding human behavior. All students participate in a service learning experience (PSY101L) in which they apply course concepts in real world situations and organizations. Discussions within this class include Christian perspectives on current issues in human behavior, cognition, and motivation. Meets the general education psychology requirement. (Offered every semester in conjunction with PSY101L.) (A section of PSY101 H Honors: General Psychology is offered fall semester in odd calendar years for members of the Honors Program.)ss
SOC 101 Principles of Sociology Three Credits A basic course introducing the student to the concepts, theories, and methods employed in an objective scientific analysis of society, culture, social institutions and organizations, social control, deviancy, and social factors involved in personality development. (Offered every semester.)
The nature, functions, and values of social work are explored. Social work is presented as a problem solving process with wide applicability in the arena of human services; thus, social work is studied within a wide spectrum of situations and institutions.
A study of problem formulation, data collection, data analysis including descriptive and inferential statistical techniques, and research report writing. Includes two or more applied projects, usually in collaboration with the entire class or with a group, and the development of a publication-ready research paper. Prerequisites: SOCI101, SCWK202 (may be taken concurrently). (Offered fall semester.)
PSY 212 Developmental Psychology Three Credits This lifespan development course examines human growth and development from prenatal life through old age. Advances in research illumine the intellectual, emotional, social, moral, and religious development processes in persons across cultures and socio-economic strata. Group presentations as well as written reflections and reading reports assess student mastery of this course. Prerequisite: PSY 101. (Offered spring semester.)
A course designed to develop the student's awareness of alternative methods of treatment available and to help the student develop the skills and techniques that are essential to professional competency in the "helping" processes. Prerequisite: SWK 205. (Offered spring semester every third year.)
The study of a variety of social organizations and of the policies enacted or pursued related to mission, structure, and social-political environments. Governmental and non-governmental agencies in the areas of socail work and criminal justics will be included. Using organizational theory and real-life models, students will engage in institutional problem solving exercises. Cross listed with CRJ 361 and SOC 361. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or consent of instructor. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
SOC 380 Sociological Theory Three Credits ( WI ) The development of major schools of social thought, major social theorists and their distinctive contributions to the understanding of the society, culture, and modernity, are considered and analyzed. Requires three of four major papers which focus respectively on social philosophers of antiquity, the major founders of sociological theory, modern social theories and theoretical trends and everyday applications of social theory. Also covers how to write a "literature review" for a research paper. Meets the general education writing-intensive requirement. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or consent of instructor. (Offered fall semester.)
Each student must successfully complete a minimum practicum experience totalling ten to twelve semester hours, where 40 clock hours on location equals one hour of credit. Ideally, each practicum should be based at a social work agency or similar organization such as a school, church, health clinic, etc. which specializes in human services. Ideally an on-site supervisor with an MSW degree or LCSW license will supervise the student's practicum. Prerequisite: SOCI 101, SCWK 202, SCWK 210, SCWK 205 and upper division status.
In this course students will learn about managing human behavior within a law enforcement agency, how these organizations function, and how humans interact with the organization. The student will learn that life within organizations is often governed very much in similar ways to life outside the workplace, where their actions are dictated by norms, cultures, and standards. These very characteristics show that human behavior is indeed predictable and are use to accomplish organizational goals. The student will come to understand behavior from different levels of analysis: the individual, groups, and organization-wide. This is a required course for the Criminal Justice Administration major.
A study of courtship, marriage, and family in its historical development and many contemporary forms. Emphasis is placed on factors providing stability or stress to modern courtships and marriages. A combination of theoretical perspectives are used (sociological, psychological, anthropological, theological), and several professional and practical issues (parenting, financial planning, communication, divorce, etc.) are examined. Cross listed with SOCI301. Prerequisites: SOC 101, 112, or PSY 101. (Offered spring semester.)
A large part of law enforcement is attempting to control deviant behavior. It may be surprising to learn that the rules of society creates often have a historical context and a bit of politics behind them. Therefore what was legal in the past may not be legal today, and what is illegal today may be legal in the future. Christians have traditionally emphasized specific values (e.g., the Ten Commandments) as a benefit to society at large. Therefore, those who are responsible for restraining deviant behavior should be armed with knowledge of how deviance is defined, how some seem to find benefit from a deviant identity, and what potential systems dysfunctions prevent effective changes. This course helps students understand how deviant behavior is determined by society, theories that describe why deviant behavior happens, and the social control systems that attempt to restrain it. This is a required course for the Criminal Justice Administration major.
The status of "minority group" is defined and dominant-subdominant relationships in society are examined. The value and challenges of diversity in a pluralistic society are presented. An emphasis is placed on the social factors traditionally included under diversity (e.g. race, ethnicity, deviant lifestyles), and non-traditional factors (religion, social class, geographic setting, etc.). Techniques for resolving problems as well as patterns of adaptation are considered. Meets the general education cross cultural requirement. Cross listed with SOCI302. (Offered irregularly.)
SOC 303 Crime and Social Deviancy Three Credits A social and social psychological approach to the study of disvalued persons and behavior. Theoretical approaches to causes and control of deviant behavior are studied with a major emphasis placed on crime and criminals. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or consent of the instructor. (Offered fall semester of even calendar years.)
This course will provide an overview of the history and application of law enforcement and intelligence. Moreover, the course will review the numerous challenges presented to officials in the law enforcement and intelligence communities. Topics include the integration of intelligence and policing within the community, the development of the intelligence cycle, structure, and the application of legal and ethical parameters to intelligence work. The student will develop critical thinking skills and an understanding of intelligence work at the operational, tactical, and stragetic levels. This is a required course for the Criminal Justice Administration major.
This course presents an introduction to Social Psychology by exploring theories and research related to social perceptions, social influence, and social relations. Major topics to be covered in the course include, but are not limited to, social influence processes, interpersonal attraction, group behavior, aggression, conformity, and attitude formation and change. Students will further explore these topics by designing and conducting a social psychological research project. Cross listed with SOC304. Prerequisites: PSY 101, SOC 101, PSY or SOC 202, and PSY 210 or SOC 210. (Offered fall semester.)
This course will focus on the use of partnerships between law enforcement and the communities they serve to solve problems, improve trust, and promote public safety. An overview of the history and application of law enforcement and police community relations will be given, as well as a review of the numerous challenges presented to law enforcement officials regarding police community relations in the communities they police. Topics include the administration of justice and the police; the police role in a changing society; police-community relations; public relations and community relations; community oriented policing; and community participation in the new millennium. The student will develop critical thinking skills and an understanding of police community relations at the operational, tactical, and strategic levels.
A course designed to develop the student's awareness of alternative methods of treatment available and to help the student develop the skills and techniques that are essential to professional competency in the "helping" processes. Prerequisite: SWK 205. (Offered spring semester every third year.)
This course will provide an overview of some of the largest segments of transnational organized crime. Students in the class will develop a fundamental understanding of issues related to human trafficking, cybercrime, and international organized/drug-related crime. Students will be presented with information about how these particular crime problems operate and influence the world economy. The student will develop analytic skills to think about crime issues internationally and with a worldview different than their own.
This course will provide an overview of vice and narcotics crimes. These crimes deal with issues which are policed based on their moral ramifications. This study will examine how certain behaviors become taboo by cultural standards, how they are criminalized, and what happens to those who are convicted of such crimes. During the course, students will learn about how police agencies attempt to mitigate threats to the United States.
This course covers the purpose and value of research as a problem-solving tool in criminal justice. Students will learn to form testable hypotheses, create questionnaires, gather and analyze data, and to read research articles with critical understanding.
This course will give students the basic skills needed to interpret statistics and the presentation of data including data from the FBI Uniform Crime Reports and other governmental databases. This course wil also help students better understand the research of others, such as research articles or summaries of articles from criminal justice trade journals. Students will also be able to generate some charts and data summaires of their own. Skills in knowing how to use the computer as a tool in the research process will be taught. This is a required course for the Criminal Justice Administraiton major.
Criminal justice organizations are increasingly relying on the accumulation and analysis of data. This course builds on Research Methods in Criminal Justice by having students identify a problem and create a research project that can address it. Students will gather data, analyze it, and report results and conclusions in a professional manner. Prerequisite: CRJS307.
This course covers specific domains of generalist social work practice: exploring, assessing, and planning, the change oriented-phase, and the termination and evaluation phase. Students will have an opportunity to work with simulation cases throughout the entire cycle of interventions. Students will be exposerd to different methodologies and interventions as they relate to specific populations (i.e. numerical minorities, homosexuals, etc.) Prereq: SWK 205 and PSY 212. (Offered spring semester every third year)
In this course students will learn what is required to provide ethical and effective leadership within a law enforcement agency while building trust between citizens and police officers. The course will examine various policing strategies and the advantages and disadvantages of each strategy. You will also learn about the basic administrative responsibilities required of any law enforcement agency including planning, budgeting, organizational design, and assessment. We will also examine the important area of human resource management concerning the recruiting and hiring of personnel. Lastly, you will come to understand the concepts and principles that are essential in leading others in a way that inspires them to want to follow you.
This course examines theoretical and conceptual issues, empirical research, and social policies germane to human sexuality. Students should be aware that while this course may prompt them to think about their own sexuality more systematically, the course is not designed to be a "personal growth" experience. Instead, students should expect to approach sexuality more analytically and to develop a sociological and social psychological understanding of the diverse issues covered in this course. Cross listed with SOCI311. (Offered fall semester of even calendar years.)
This course will provide an overview of the structure and development of the homeland security network of the United States. This study will examine the dominant Intelligence Community position in this structure, but will also address some of the law enforcement components which further support the system. During the course, students will learn about the roles of member agencies and how they mitigate threats to the United States.
This course will provide an overview of the history and theoretical concepts which drive terrorism. Students in the class will be presented with information about how terror groups develop, how they target democracies, and how they decide on the methods used in their conflicts. The student will develop analytic skills to look at a conflict and determine the best methods for understanding and mitigating the threat.
In this course, students will study ethical decision-making processes that are implemented in criminal justice organizations. Students will also learn to identify ethical dilemmas and consider ethical theories and strategies for considering and dealing with these dilemmas. Enrollment preference will be given to Juniors and Seniors who are Criminal Justice majors. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
Psychological and social factors combine to produce human behavior. This course explores some of both elements, helping students gain a theoretical foundation in understanding healthy individual differences as well as deviances from social norms. Students also learn theories of social control and how they are applied.
This course will cover ways in which the social worker interfaces with the law, courts, and clients mandated or involved with the law or court system in social work practice. Social work students will also gain knowledge of mandated reporting, ethics in social work practice pertaining to the law, human rights, the pursuit of justice for all populations, and protection of diverse populations. Prerequisite: SCWK205. (Offered spring semester of odd calendar years.)
In this course students will learn about various aspects of adult development and aging, including health and mental health functioning, longevity, working with the person in their environment, cognition, intelligence, memory and attention, clinical assessment, work, retirement, relationships, and dying and bereavement (including Hospice work), and ethical issues within social work practice. Human rights and issues of dignity and respect for each individual will be emphasized. Prerequisite: PSYC212 and SCWK205. (Offered spring semester of odd calendar years.)
This course will introduce students to the operation and administration of police agencies. Through class discussion, student engagement, and multi-media resources, students will develop a better understanding of how administration plays an essential role in law enforcement. Students will be introduced to various leadership roles within criminal justice administration. Prerequisite: CRSJ 203. (Offered spring semester of odd calendar years.)
This course will introduce students to the basic operation of homeland and border security agencies. Through class discussion, student engagement, and multi-media recourses, students will develop a better understanding of these agencies, and the strategies of law enforcement personnel and support staff within these operations. Students will be introduced to various theories of homeland and border protection issues, including current intelligence initiatives with respect to foreign or home-grown terrorism. Prerequisite: CRJS203. (Offered spring semester of odd calendar years.)
A course designed to investigate delinquency, including juvenile deviancy and juvenile crime. Applicable theories and models of delinquency will be investigated, as will social construction of delinquency. The course is appropriate for the students focusing on criminal justice generally as well as social work. Professional implications will also be examined. Prereq: SOCI 101 (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years)
A course designed to investigate delinquency, including juvenile deviancy and juvenile crime. Applicable theories and models of delinquency will be investigated, as will social construction of delinquency. The course is appropriate for students focusing on criminal justice generally, as well as social work. Professional implications will also be examined. Cross listed with CRJ 351, SOC 351. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or consent of instructor. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
This course introduces the student to the basic services available under the auspices of child welfare. The major emphasis is on services as offered within the United States; however, brief attention is given to a comparison with other countries. A historical overview of the field is also provided. Prerequisite: SWK 205, 208. (Offered spring semester of odd calendar years.)
SOC 381 Social Context for Community Development Three Credits The different bases for healthy communities are explored, with emphasis on anthropological, sociological and biblical models of community. This will include how to revitalize communities which suffer from various problems with complex social causes, such as those with high rates of poverty, unemployment, illiteracy, criminal activity, welfare dependency or social service delivery, spiritual apathy and even war and refugeeism. A practical emphasis on community-building programs, policies or advocacy is included. Key field trip experiences will link class participants with practitioners in the field. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
SCWK389 Jr Departmental Honors Research (2 Credits)
Selected Readings in an area not covered by course offerings, often in the general topic area of the chosen senior project. Annotated bibliography, reading notes, and a comprehensive research paper required. Cross listed with CRJ 390 and SOC 390. (Variable credit 1-3 cr.) Prereq: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in SWK 471.
SCWK489 Departmental Honors Research (2 Credits)
SCWK490 Departmental Honors Thesis (2 Credits)
Course content focuses upon basic concepts and operations in descriptive and inferential statistics. The areas of study will include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, correlation and regression analysis, and various tests of significance using both parametric and nonparametric procedures. Cross listed with SOCI and SCWK 202. Meets quantitative reasoning requirement. (Offered every semester.)
A study of basic concepts and operations in descriptive and inferential statistics. The areas of study will include graphic representations, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, and various significant tests of relationship, including measures of association, correlation, linear relationship, and means tests. This course includes an introduction to multivariate statistics and non-parametrics. Cross listed with PSYC and SOCI202. Meets Quantitative Reasoning requirement. (Offered every semester.)
Explore the beautiful Riviera Maya with fantastic cities such as Uxmal, Chichen Itzá and the gorgeous city of Mérida. Learn from the indigenous Maya people about their culture, traditions, and ancient history. Become acquainted with their art forms in order to appreciate the beauty of these people while reflecting on our faith. Do homework on the Caribean beach, enjoy breathtaking views, dine at exquisite and tasty restaurants and discover vibrant markets. Leave the classroom behind. Learn in a new way under the sun. Meets the general education global foundations requirement.
The purpose of this course is to explore race and poverty issues that impact the classroom environment. Candidates will search for effective strategies to better meet the needs of underserved populations. The hidden rules of economic class and characteristics of generational poverty will be studied, with emphasis on the impact this has on instruction. Students will spend time assisting in a classroom which serves a high minority and low socioeconomic population. This course meets the general education global foundations requirement. Prerequisite: EDUC 101. (Offered every Interterm.) IN18 - $60 Fee
African American History I (1492-1860) explores the history of American slavery from its beginnings in the West Indies through colonization and up to the Civil War. The course examines the Atlantic slave trade (until its abolition in 1808), domestic slavery in America, the political and ideological divide within America (during this time period) over the issue of slavery, and the efforts of American and British abolitionists to end slavery.
African American History II (1860-1970) examines the halting progress Americans made during the 100 years between the Emancipation Proclamation and the civil rights legislation of the 1960's. Students consider the perspective of significant American civil rights activists, including W. E. B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin, Mary Church Terrell, Anna Julia Cooper, Marcus Garvey, A. Philip Randolph, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr.
African American History I (1492-1860) explores the history of American slavery from its beginnings in the West Indies through colonization and up to the Civil War. The course examines the Atlantic slave trade (until its abolition in 1808), domestic slavery in America, the political and ideological divide within America (during this time period) over the issue of slavery, and the efforts of American and British abolitionists to end slavery.
African American History II (1860-1970) examines the halting progress Americans made during the 100 years between the Emancipation Proclamation and the civil rights legislation of the 1960's. Students consider the perspective of significant American civil rights activists, including W. E. B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin, Mary Church Terrell, Anna Julia Cooper, Marcus Garvey, A. Philip Randolph, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr.

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