Music Business Major

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Courses

Visit the Online Undergraduate Catalog for an explanation of graduation requirements.

The music business major requires students to complete 51 hours of general education courses, 54-5 hours in the major, and 16 hours of electives. Students who complete the major are eligible to receive a bachelor of science degree.

Music Business Major Courses

What makes some for-profit businesses and not-for-profit organizations excel while other fail to thrive? Often it’s due to the quality of management within the organization. Management of people is distinct skill set that is critically important and these skills can be studied, understood, and practiced. In this course, students will learn the elements of business management, the theory behind them and practical tools with which to apply them. Key topics such as communication, leadership, teamwork, conflict management, change and more will be covered. No matter where a person works or volunteers, they will be able to contribute to the success of any organization when they have a clear understanding of management theory and techniques. (Offered every semester.)
The beginning of the one-year economics principles course, emphasizing profit maximizing for the firm, how government regulation affects business, and growth/environment questions. Moderate emphasis on mathematical analysis.
This course serves students from any major interested in studying the business and industries related to Music, Media, and Entertainment. Students enrolled in this course will acquire industry standard knowledge related to key concepts, terminology, and organizational structures. Students will also complete analysis of the cultural impact of Music, Media, and Entertainment Business.
This introductory course examines business from an entrepreneurial perspective. It will provide students with an introduction to the potential and pitfalls of entrepreneurship and its impact on the economic development within a community. Throughout the course, students will examine the various methods for starting up, managing and financing a new business enterprise. This process will culminate in the development of a viable business plan. The overarching goal of this course is to familiarize the student with business terminology in order to introduce him or her to the business program at Greenville University.
This course is designed to teach skills and attitudes required for young professionals entering this field. Students will learn and apply best practices to further professional development. Development areas may include communication skills, digital etiquette, professional dress, etc. Students will also complete an internship ready resume' and will prepare, practice, and receive coaching for future interviews.
The present marketing system is described, analyzed, and evaluated through study of consumers, marketing functions, institutions, and commodities. The motivation of mass markets through advertising and personal selling is given special attention.
A study of contracts, torts, agency, bailments, and property with emphasis on the social forces that have and will affect our legal rights and duties. (Offered fall semester.)
This course will further develop students marketing skills and knowledge directly related to their specialization. This course will survey current trends, innovations and data necessary for marketing within the field. Students will have the opportunity to continue management projects by creating and implementing marking plans for promotion of such projects.
This course will focus on all aspects of artist and event management, including talent, business, tour management, booking, planning, logistics, contracts, and promotion. Students will engage in a semester long experience based artist/event management project to enhance learning and preparation for work in this field. Students are required to use and must secure access to Microsoft Excel before enrolling.
This course is an experience and project based course designed to encourage hands on innovation. Students will gain insight into the roles and responsibilities of entrepreneurs in organizations both large and small. Students will also engage in a semester long project on campus or with local partners to enhance their understanding of innovation, strategic planning, implementation strategy, research and development, product design, product marketing, and market research. Prerequisites: ACCT 101, BUSN 101, ENTR 130, and MRKT 201
Beginning with theory as taught in MKT 201 and ECON 201, students deal with selected marketing cases and learn to apply their theoretical principles. Work is both individual and in groups, and includes the creation and development of a new product. Prerequisite: MKT 201. (Offered fall semester.)
Students will understand the forces of globalization, why nations trade, problems of trade restrictions and international payments, and multinational corporations as international change agents. They will work from the manager's perspective to discover how working internationally affects the functional areas of business through influences of the land, the political environment, and the cultural heritage of the people. Meets the general education cross-cultural requirement. Prerequisite: Open to any upper division student. (Offered spring semester.)
This course examines how national and local managers explain the development of their careers with a particular emphasis on leadership development, ethics, and the integration of faith in their management practice. These, together with the course material and group projects, help students develop appropriate career skills. In addition to the weekly speaker summaries, students write a business case study, make microfinance loans to overseas entrepreneurs, and develop individual career plans, resumes, and job search skills. Prerequisite: BUSN 101.
Strategic Management explores how companies analyze their strategic environments, identify strategic choices and implement chosen strategies. Analytical tools include employing frameworks to analyze internal strengths and weaknesses as well as external opportunities and threats. The course is taught through an online strategic management simulation in which students compete in teams to enable them to evaluate their effectiveness in developing and implementing strategies for the firm. (Offered fall semester.)
MMEB405 Practicum (3 Credits)
Students enrolled in this course will be assigned to a student team who will then be paired with business and community leaders for work on real work, high-stakes projects. Students will create and implement solutions to actual needs faced by their assigned business leaders.
Student will engage in an intensive research based study of Music and Entertainment Law covering topics such as copyright, fair sue, licensing, publishing, and relevant legislation. Students will perform research in a self-selected area related to legal issues within the field. Students will use their research to produce a 20 page research paper that critically evaluates both supportive and oppositional positions and legal interpretations related to their topic.
This course is an experience-based course designed to empower and enhance student leadership through management and mentorship opportunities. Entrepreneurship Lab II encourages first hand experience as a way to practice skills needed for entrepreneurs at any level. Students will assume various management and mentorship roles while working with students and projects assigned through other course
Students will be introduced to a broad range of priority issues and/or topics in sport management. Issues such as: career opportunities and myths, finance, communication, facility management, event coordination, marketing, governance etc. This course provides an overview of all the major components in the sport industry. This course is not designed to provide significant depth on issues but rather deliver breath of study on key elements in the sport management field. (Offered fall semester.)
Studio work in beginning drawing from still life and nature. Basic experiences with form description using a wide range of media. Three double periods. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
This course explores digital media as an experimental cultural practice, with an emphasis on critical approaches to art and technology. Experiments in digital imaging, digital audio, digital video, and multi-media authoring will be conducted. Students will produce independent digital media production projects, individually and in groups. Course meetings include seminar-style discussion of reading and other materials, critiques of student work, tech workshops, production studios (session in which we brainstorm, research ideas, and work on projects), and screenings. (Offered every semester.)
This course will introduce students to computers and programming. It will begin with a study of computer hardware and software relationships, and a review of common operating systems in use today, with a detailed review of microcomputer operating systems. Then programming language construction and principles will be covered, culminating in problem solving and algorithm development in a high level computing language with several programming projects. Serves also as the entry point for a major in management information systems. (Offered spring semester.)
This course is designed to help students recognize sport as a microcosm of a larger society. Sport is influenced by cultural traditions, social values, and personal experience. (Offered spring semester of odd calendar years.)
This course is an introduction to the discipline and craft of storytelling using multimedia methods. Students explore the major formal elements and components of storytelling using visual, print, and auditory mediums. Students will gain a better understanding of the spiritual, social, and economic roles of storytelling both in terms of storytelling as a powerful tool for gaining an understanding of the world and oneself and as a professional craft. Prerequisite: ENG105. (Offered in the fall semester.)
This course will the primary principles of marketing with an emphasis of application or the sports industry. Topics covered include environmental scanning and planning, market research, consumer behavior, market segmentation and the development of integrated marketing communication using the 4 Ps (product, price, placement, and promotion). Guest speakers, research projects, and case studies will allow the student to apply concepts learned. (Offered fall semester of even calendar years.) Prerequisite: SMG101.
Sports law is the frame of legal issues in both amateur and professional sports. It overlaps with labor law, contract law, competition or antitrust law, and tort law. The area of law was established as a separate entity only a few decades ago, corresponding with the increased role of player-agents and media scrutiny of sports law topics. This course is designed to provide students the vital understanding of legal issues in sport. Topics include but are not limited to: negligence, liability, risk management, waivers, federal legislation, contract law, employment law, anti-trust legislation, labor law, and intellectual property. Case studies are used to help students apply the material. Prerequisite: SMG101. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
A study of administration of athletics and physical education as it pertains to budget, liability, policy making, public relations, facility management, and other administrative responsibilities. (Offered Spring semester of even calendar years.)
"Show me the money!" is a well-known phrase from the sport movie "Jerry McGuire" and this course covers two important money topics in sport management: financial principles and fundraising. The comprehensive financial overview will include topics such as budgeting, financial structures, analysis, stocks, bonds, capital expenditures and current trends. Concepts and best practices in fundraising, needed at all levels of sport, will also be covered. Topics will include donor relations, annual funds, priority benefits, and sales skill development. Prerequisite: SMG101. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
Game Day. It's what fans and participants live for. But making the experience a positive one for all involved takes detailed planning and execution. In this course students will learn how to plan, staff, budget, market, promote and manage an event. Venues are also key factors for all events and programs, whether at the recreation, club, collegiate or professional level. Therefore, facility management topics covered will include facility development, budgeting, staffing, and managing. Prerequisite: SMG101. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
Students will exlore the important concepts in the field of sports management: sponsorship, sales, and ticketing. Students will comprehend the misconception and potential career path in ticketing as well as, but not limited to, effective sales techniques and the criteria for finding a great marketing niche through sponsorship. This course will attempt to balance theoretical models and case studies to help the student grow in their knowledge of sponsorship and ticketing. (Offered spring semester of odd calendar years.)

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Career Opportunities

  • Booking Agent
  • Band Manager
  • Record Label Employee
  • Venue Operator
  • Production Manager at Venue
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Greenville, Illinois 62246-1145
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