History Education Major

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Courses

Visit the Online Undergraduate Catalog for an explanation of graduation requirements.

The history education major requires students to complete 42 credits in history (beyond HST 101) and related social studies subject areas, and 46 credits of professional studies in education. This major leads to a bachelor of science degree.

 

History Education Major Courses

This course prepares the candidate for admission to Teacher Education. Course content includes the characteristics of the Greenville University Teacher Education Program, a survey of the legal, social and ethical issues involved in public school education, an introduction to program portfolio development, and a correlation of psychological principles to varied learning styles and milieus. This course is conducted on campus and includes field experience in school settings that have a large minority population. This course will give students the opportunity to determine whether they want to persist in the Teacher Education Program. (Offered fall semester for transfer students and students with special needs by permission of instructor, and offered every Interterm for freshmen.) Pre-requisite: signature of instructor IN15 - $92 Fee.
The purpose of this course is to explore race and poverty issues that impact the classroom environment. Candidates will search for effective strategies to better meet the needs of underserved populations. The hidden rules of economic class and characteristics of generational poverty will be studied, with emphasis on the impact this has on instruction. Students will spend time assisting in a classroom which serves a high minority and low socioeconomic population. This course meets the general education global foundations requirement. Prerequisite: EDUC 101. (Offered every Interterm.) IN18 - $60 Fee
This course will examine the historical context, diverse characteristics, and individual planning for the exceptional child. Students in this course will explore how individuals develop and learn within the context of their cultural, linguistic, and academic experiences. Co-teaching instructional plans based on diverse student characteristics, student performance data, and curriculum goals will be developed. Thirty hours of field experience in a special education classroom are required. Prerequisite: EDU 101. (Offered every semester.)
This course will provide a current and comprehensive overview of research and theory related to human learning. The course will emphasize major concepts of learning theory but will also cover relevant motivational and developmental theories. The course will underscore the relationship between theory, research, and practice. Prerequisite: EDUC101; Corequisite: EDUC280. (Offered every term.)
EDU 316 Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum Three Credits Emphasis is on teaching reading and writing in content areas from grades 6 through 12. Relationships between reading, literacy, and writing within content areas are established and ways of meeting the needs of culturally diverse and dysfunctional students are explored. Candidates design appropriate learning experiences and apply reading-study skills to the content areas. Field experiences required. Cross listed with ENG 316. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. (Offered fall semester.)
This course will investigate the structures of a safe and healthy learning environment that facilitates cultural and linguistic responsiveness, positive social interaction, active engagement, and academic risk-taking. A three tiered level of positive behavior supports (PBS) will be explored as a framework for creating plans to accomplish a productive learning environment. Twenty hours of field experience required. Prerequisite: EDU280
This course is designed to explore classroom evaluation of student growth as an integral part of instruction. Candidates explore the purpose of evaluation as it relates to planning instruction. Professional, social, ethical, and philosophical considerations related to teaching/learning are also explored. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. (Offered every semester.)
This course focuses on curriculum and instruction as it applies to the grades nine through twelve. Teacher candidates explore curriculum and instruction specific to their designated content area. The course content includes exploring national and state standards, exploring local standards, writing instructional objectives, and exploring and designing student centered instruction. The course has a field experience component. Prerequisite: EDUC202, 280, and 282. (Offered every semester.)
After admission to the professional internship , candidates receive student teaching placements. Candidates work with their cooperating teachers during the first week of school. Five days of clinical experience required. Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Internship. (Offered fall semester)
Teacher candidates work to integrate prior coursework experienced into the context of real classrooms. Teacher candidates develop a teaching philosophy and an operational "professional identity." Candidates consider the impact that various factors have on the learning environment, develop teaching strategies that promote active learning and which engage students with diverse abilities, cultures, and ethnicity. Candidates explore methods specific to their subject areas under the additional guidance of the program coordinator. Teacher candidates will engage in preparing for the edTPA. Candidates complete a minimum of 15 hours in the clinical setting completing pre-mini student teaching assignments. Students must take EDU409 and 410 (Offered Interterm) during the same academic year. Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program; EDU316, 333, and 340. (Offered fall semester.)
Candidates complete a mini-student teaching experience, consisting of 12 full days in the secondary classroom. Teacher candidates will meet on campus for a minimum of three class sessions. The course faculty member, assisted by the Director of Field Experience, will determine the placement for the clinical experience. Students must take EDU409 in the same academic year. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and EDUC 409. (Offered Interterm.)
EDU 421 Secondary Student Teaching Seven* or Fifteen Credits Full semester of student teaching required for secondary education majors. *K-12 physical education majors are required to complete eight weeks of student teaching in conjunction with EDU 424. Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Internship. (Offered every semester.)
The seminar addresses professional topics within the field of education and provides an opportunity for teacher candidates to focus on the required performance assessment. The performance assessment, aligned with state standards, is an authentic assessment tool that shows how teacher candidates develop and evaluate student learning. The portfolio documents practices in the areas of planning, instruction, assessment, analyzing teaching, and academic learning to reveal the impact of a candidate's teaching performance on student learning. This course is to be taken concurrently with student teaching and is pass/fail. Prerequisite: EDU410.
This course introduces psychology as a science and emphasizes the interaction of social, cognitive, emotional, motivational, and organizational approaches to understanding human behavior. All students participate in a service learning experience (PSY101L) in which they apply course concepts in real world situations and organizations. Discussions within this class include Christian perspectives on current issues in human behavior, cognition, and motivation. Meets the general education psychology requirement. (Offered every semester in conjunction with PSY101L.) (A section of PSY101 H Honors: General Psychology is offered fall semester in odd calendar years for members of the Honors Program.)ss
SOC 101 Principles of Sociology Three Credits A basic course introducing the student to the concepts, theories, and methods employed in an objective scientific analysis of society, culture, social institutions and organizations, social control, deviancy, and social factors involved in personality development. (Offered every semester.)
The development of Western Civilization from the earliest civilizations in the Ancient Near East to the present, analyzing political, social, cultural, economic, and religious ideas and meaningfully applying them to contemporary life. (Offered every semester.)
The scientific study of humanity, human origins, fossil forms, and the evolution of material and non-material culture. Meets the general education cross-cultural requirement. Prerequisite: SOC 101 is recommended. (Offered spring semester.)
The study of the history and culture of China and Japan from ancient times to the present. Meets the general education cross-cultural requirement. (Offered spring semester.)
Examines structures, functions, and policies of the national government. (Offered spring semester.)
This course allows students the ability to practice and refine the skills necessary for successful secondary history instruction. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
This course examines the settlement, colonization and nation-building of the United States from roughly 1600-1865. This course focuses on the context in which European settlers and the Africans whom they enslaved built a nation, wresting North America from native tribes. We will investigate the loyalties that guided settlers' beliefs and actions; the multi-faceted conflicts that led future generations to demand liberty; and the conflicted notions of equality, democracy and justice that guided the United States in its first eight decades. (Offered fall semester.)
Emphasizes the forces that shaped and are now reshaping the region. Examines historical reasons for the present problems that trouble the area. Cross listed with HIST110 and SPAN 310. Meets the general education cross-cultural requirement. (Offered fall semester.)
A course in the techniques of historical research and writing. Prerequisite: HST 101 or 201 or equivalent. (Offered spring semester of odd calendar years.)
This course will help students to produce enough to support themselves and family, consume resources and products wisely, provide for their own future needs, support government's appropriate role in our productivity, and consider the needs of their children, and enable them to live productive lives. (Offered fall semester.)
The beginning of the one-year economics principles course, emphasizing profit maximizing for the firm, how government regulation affects business, and growth/environment questions. Moderate emphasis on mathematical analysis.
For second year business students, emphasizing economic principles, national income, employment, inflation, and fiscal and monetary policy.
An interdisciplinary course organized for studying backgrounds to current economic problems in context with related social, political, and religious issues. (Offered irregularly.)
Students will study two kinds of environmental issues: resource conservation and pollution of the environment. In both cases students will consider whether markets can achieve the best results for humankind, or whether stated intervention and control to keep us safe and healthy. Prerequisite: ECON201. (Offered irregularly.)
Study of why the world works the way it does, how its unique regions have taken shape, and how those regions are increasingly interconnected. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
This course examines the development of U.S. social, cultural, and political history from World War I to the present. Prerequisite: HST 201 or permission of instructor. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
African American History I (1492-1860) explores the history of American slavery from its beginnings in the West Indies through colonization and up to the Civil War. The course examines the Atlantic slave trade (until its abolition in 1808), domestic slavery in America, the political and ideological divide within America (during this time period) over the issue of slavery, and the efforts of American and British abolitionists to end slavery.
African American History II (1860-1970) examines the halting progress Americans made during the 100 years between the Emancipation Proclamation and the civil rights legislation of the 1960's. Students consider the perspective of significant American civil rights activists, including W. E. B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin, Mary Church Terrell, Anna Julia Cooper, Marcus Garvey, A. Philip Randolph, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr.
This class will focus on a particular aspect of American History such as a particular geographic location, a particular social/political construct. or a particular group of people. May be repeated for a total of six credits.
This course will focus on the historical and contemporary conditions of ordinary people in Latin America. Besides written sources, we will make use of an important historical source, Latin America feature films, to illustrate how economic dependency and underdevelopment have conditioned the lives of the continent's inhabitants, but also how Latin Americans have adapted and responded to these conditions. In addition, as social history, this course will focus on groups traditionally marginalized in the study of history: women, children, peasants, Indians, and others.
The systematic study of the development of Western Christendom from the first through the fifteenth centuries focusing on major themes, figures, actions, and impulses. The historical method of research will be employed as a means of helping students to gain a contextualized understanding and appreciation for the developing role of the church and its relationship to culture. A major emphasis will be placed on the reading of primary sources as a means for understanding the development of Christian theology. Cross listed with THEO 343. Prerequisite: THEO 110. (Offered spring semester of odd calendar years.)
The systematic study of the development of Western Christendom from the sixteenth through the twentieth centuries focusing on major themes, figures, actions, and impulses. The historical method of research will be employed as a means of helping students to gain a contextualized understanding and appreciation for the developing role of the church and its relationship to culture. A major emphasis will be placed on the reading of primary sources as a means for understanding the development of Christian theology. Cross listed with THEO 344. Prerequisite: THEO 110. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
A study of the Jewish religion/culture that developed in the sixth century BCE and flourished in the Persian, Greek and Roman periods. Includes encounters with the rabbinic literature that began to be produced in the second centruy CE--the Midrashim, Mishanah and Talmuds--and modern expressions of Judaism around the world. Cross listed with REL 345. Prerequisite: COR 102 or Bible course or permission of the instructor. (Offered spring semester.)
This course seeks to increase awareness of the uniqueness of Mexican culture, society, and politics and to promote an understanding of the forces driving changes in these areas. Meets the general educastion cross cultural requirement. Prerequisite: HST101 and a History major. (Offered spring semster of even calendar years.)
An interdisciplinary course organized for studying backgrounds to current economic problems in context with related social, political, and religious issues. Meets the general education cross cultural requirement. (Offered irregularlyfall semester of odd calendar years.)
This course examines the development of Russian poitics, religion and culture from the prehistoric period to the present. This allows study of a culture which is connected to the European societies with which students are familiar, but which has been strikingly different in may ways. Prerequisite: HST 101. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
Historiography is the analysis of the theories through which we have understood history.
This course is intended to make students into better citizens both by introducing them to current world and national political events, discussing these issues, and giving students the tools to remain informed about such issues. (Offered spring semester of odd calendar years.)
SOCI125 International Development Theory (3 Credits)
This class will focus on a particular aspect of American History such as a particular geographic location, a particular social/political construct. or a particular group of people. May be repeated for a total of six credits.
HIST199 Open Titled (3 Credits)
POLS199 Open Titled (3 Credits)
A study of problem formulation, data collection, data analysis including descriptive and inferential statistical techniques, and research report writing. Includes two or more applied projects, usually in collaboration with the entire class or with a group, and the development of a publication-ready research paper. Prerequisites: SOC 101, 202 (may be taken concurrently). (Offered fall semester.)
African American History I (1492-1860) explores the history of American slavery from its beginnings in the West Indies through colonization and up to the Civil War. The course examines the Atlantic slave trade (until its abolition in 1808), domestic slavery in America, the political and ideological divide within America (during this time period) over the issue of slavery, and the efforts of American and British abolitionists to end slavery.
African American History II (1860-1970) examines the halting progress Americans made during the 100 years between the Emancipation Proclamation and the civil rights legislation of the 1960's. Students consider the perspective of significant American civil rights activists, including W. E. B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin, Mary Church Terrell, Anna Julia Cooper, Marcus Garvey, A. Philip Randolph, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr.
This course will focus on the historical and contemporary conditions of ordinary people in Latin America. Besides written sources, we will make use of an important historical source, Latin America feature films, to illustrate how economic dependency and underdevelopment have conditioned the lives of the continent's inhabitants, but also how Latin Americans have adapted and responded to these conditions. In addition, as social history, this course will focus on groups traditionally marginalized in the study of history: women, children, peasants, Indians, and others.
A study of the history, culture and texts of Jews, Christians and Muslims based upon an examination of the significance of monotheism, Scripture, authority, ritual, family life, ethics, material culture, within each group. Observation of concepts and phenomena they share, as well as the ways they are distinguished for the purpose of understanding each group's origin, development, influence, and connection to civil/political orders. Cross listed with REL 245. Meets the general educaion cross cultural requirement. Prerequisite: COR 102 (may be taken concurrently) or Bible course or permission of instructor. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
This course seeks to increase awareness of the uniqueness of Mexican culture, society, and politics and to promote an understanding of the forces driving changes in these areas. Meets the general education cross cultural requirement. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
Major thinkers and themes of philosophical thought from Thales in the sixth century B.C.E., to the late fifteenth century medieval scholastics will be studied. Special attention will be given to the thought of Plato, Aristotle, Augustine and Thomas Aquinas and how these thinkers approached metaphysical, ontological, and ethical problems. Cross Listed with PHL250. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
Major thinkers and themes of philosophical thought from Bacon through the twentieth century will be studied. Special attention will be given to epistemology and metaphysics. The perspectives of rationalism, empiricism, transcendental idealism, existentialism and twentieth century analytical thought will play a key role through this course. Cross listed with PHL251. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
SOC 303 Crime and Social Deviancy Three Credits A social and social psychological approach to the study of disvalued persons and behavior. Theoretical approaches to causes and control of deviant behavior are studied with a major emphasis placed on crime and criminals. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or consent of the instructor. (Offered fall semester of even calendar years.)
This course presents an introduction to Social Psychology by exploring theories and research related to social perceptions, social influence, and social relations. Major topics to be covered in the course include, but are not limited to, social influence processes, interpersonal attraction, group behavior, aggression, conformity, and attitude formation and change. Students will further explore these topics by designing and conducting a social psychological research project. Cross listed with SOC304. Prerequisites: PSY 101, SOC 101, PSY or SOC 202, and PSY 210 or SOC 210. (Offered fall semester.)
This course examines the development of U.S. social, cultural, and political history from World War I to the present. Prerequisite: HST 201 or permission of instructor. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
An introduction to the philosophical, social, historical, and legal aspects of the U. S. Constitution through case study to prepare students for political/legal research on contemporary issues. Prerequisite: POL 210, shoudl be taken concurrently with HST 201. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
Concerns political ideas from Plato to the present, analyzed from the perspective of the Judeo-Christian-Classical tradition. Cross listed with PHL 311. Prerequisite: POL 210. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
A study of the foreign policy of the United States from Teddy Roosevelt to George W. Bush. Prereq: HST 201. (Offered fall semester of even calender years).
This course is intended to make students into better citizens both by introducing them to current world and national political events, discussing these issues, and giving students the tools to remain informed about such issues. (Offered spring semester of odd calendar years.)
African American History I (1492-1860) explores the history of American slavery from its beginnings in the West Indies through colonization and up to the Civil War. The course examines the Atlantic slave trade (until its abolition in 1808), domestic slavery in America, the political and ideological divide within America (during this time period) over the issue of slavery, and the efforts of American and British abolitionists to end slavery.
African American History II (1860-1970) examines the halting progress Americans made during the 100 years between the Emancipation Proclamation and the civil rights legislation of the 1960's. Students consider the perspective of significant American civil rights activists, including W. E. B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin, Mary Church Terrell, Anna Julia Cooper, Marcus Garvey, A. Philip Randolph, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr.
This class will focus on a particular aspect of American History such as a particular geographic location, a particular social/political construct. or a particular group of people. May be repeated for a total of six credits.
The United States Constitution. Does a more revered political document exist in the world today? The fundamental elements of this country’s existence spring from is simply written, yet difficulty understood, pages. Throughout this course we will study the historical context of the Constitution, the powers bestowed by it to the different branches of our government, the powers bestowed by it to the people, and the Supreme Court’s continued review and interpretation of this beloved documents. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
This course will focus on the historical and contemporary conditions of ordinary people in Latin America. Besides written sources, we will make use of an important historical source, Latin America feature films, to illustrate how economic dependency and underdevelopment have conditioned the lives of the continent's inhabitants, but also how Latin Americans have adapted and responded to these conditions. In addition, as social history, this course will focus on groups traditionally marginalized in the study of history: women, children, peasants, Indians, and others.
The systematic study of the development of Western Christendom from the first through the fifteenth centuries focusing on major themes, figures, actions, and impulses. The historical method of research will be employed as a means of helping students to gain a contextualized understanding and appreciation for the developing role of the church and its relationship to culture. A major emphasis will be placed on the reading of primary sources as a means for understanding the development of Christian theology. Cross listed with THEO 343. Prerequisite: THEO 110. (Offered spring semester of odd calendar years.)
The systematic study of the development of Western Christendom from the sixteenth through the twentieth centuries focusing on major themes, figures, actions, and impulses. The historical method of research will be employed as a means of helping students to gain a contextualized understanding and appreciation for the developing role of the church and its relationship to culture. A major emphasis will be placed on the reading of primary sources as a means for understanding the development of Christian theology. Cross listed with THEO 344. Prerequisite: THEO 110. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
A study of the Jewish religion/culture that developed in the sixth century BCE and flourished in the Persian, Greek and Roman periods. Includes encounters with the rabbinic literature that began to be produced in the second centruy CE--the Midrashim, Mishanah and Talmuds--and modern expressions of Judaism around the world. Cross listed with REL 345. Prerequisite: COR 102 or Bible course or permission of the instructor. (Offered spring semester.)
This course seeks to increase awareness of the uniqueness of Mexican culture, society, and politics and to promote an understanding of the forces driving changes in these areas. Meets the general educastion cross cultural requirement. Prerequisite: HST101 and a History major. (Offered spring semster of even calendar years.)
An interdisciplinary course organized for studying backgrounds to current economic problems in context with related social, political, and religious issues. Meets the general education cross cultural requirement. (Offered irregularlyfall semester of odd calendar years.)
This course examines the development of Russian poitics, religion and culture from the prehistoric period to the present. This allows study of a culture which is connected to the European societies with which students are familiar, but which has been strikingly different in may ways. Prerequisite: HST 101. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
SOC 380 Sociological Theory Three Credits ( WI ) The development of major schools of social thought, major social theorists and their distinctive contributions to the understanding of the society, culture, and modernity, are considered and analyzed. Requires three of four major papers which focus respectively on social philosophers of antiquity, the major founders of sociological theory, modern social theories and theoretical trends and everyday applications of social theory. Also covers how to write a "literature review" for a research paper. Meets the general education writing-intensive requirement. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or consent of instructor. (Offered fall semester.)
SOC 381 Social Context for Community Development Three Credits The different bases for healthy communities are explored, with emphasis on anthropological, sociological and biblical models of community. This will include how to revitalize communities which suffer from various problems with complex social causes, such as those with high rates of poverty, unemployment, illiteracy, criminal activity, welfare dependency or social service delivery, spiritual apathy and even war and refugeeism. A practical emphasis on community-building programs, policies or advocacy is included. Key field trip experiences will link class participants with practitioners in the field. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
HIST399 Open Titled (3 Credits)
POLS399 Open Titled (3 Credits)
Historiography is the analysis of the theories through which we have understood history.

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