Criminal Justice Major

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Courses

Visit the Online Undergraduate Catalog for an explanation of graduation requirements.

Criminal Justice Major Courses

SOC 101 Principles of Sociology Three Credits A basic course introducing the student to the concepts, theories, and methods employed in an objective scientific analysis of society, culture, social institutions and organizations, social control, deviancy, and social factors involved in personality development. (Offered every semester.)
An advanced survey course focusing on the description and interrelationships of the many agencies and institutions which comprise criminal justice; e.g., justice systems, law enforcement, corrections, etc. Agencies and institutions will be studied in their historical and social contexts, and will be further examined by way of major theories and models of criminal justice. The various professional implications of criminal justice will be examined. Cross listed with SOCI 201. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or consent of instructor. (Offered spring semester.)
A study of problem formulation, data collection, data analysis including descriptive and inferential statistical techniques, and research report writing. Includes two or more applied projects, usually in collaboration with the entire class or with a group, and the development of a publication-ready research paper. Prerequisites: SOCI101, SCWK202 (may be taken concurrently). (Offered fall semester.)
SOC 303 Crime and Social Deviancy Three Credits A social and social psychological approach to the study of disvalued persons and behavior. Theoretical approaches to causes and control of deviant behavior are studied with a major emphasis placed on crime and criminals. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or consent of the instructor. (Offered fall semester of even calendar years.)
This course presents an introduction to Social Psychology by exploring theories and research related to social perceptions, social influence, and social relations. Major topics to be covered in the course include, but are not limited to, social influence processes, interpersonal attraction, group behavior, aggression, conformity, and attitude formation and change. Students will further explore these topics by designing and conducting a social psychological research project. Cross listed with SOC304. Prerequisites: PSY 101, SOC 101, PSY or SOC 202, and PSY 210 or SOC 210. (Offered fall semester.)
A course designed to investigate delinquency, including juvenile deviancy and juvenile crime. Applicable theories and models of delinquency will be investigated, as will social construction of delinquency. The course is appropriate for the students focusing on criminal justice generally as well as social work. Professional implications will also be examined. Prereq: SOCI 101 (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years)
SOC 380 Sociological Theory Three Credits ( WI ) The development of major schools of social thought, major social theorists and their distinctive contributions to the understanding of the society, culture, and modernity, are considered and analyzed. Requires three of four major papers which focus respectively on social philosophers of antiquity, the major founders of sociological theory, modern social theories and theoretical trends and everyday applications of social theory. Also covers how to write a "literature review" for a research paper. Meets the general education writing-intensive requirement. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or consent of instructor. (Offered fall semester.)
Each student must successfully complete one or more practicum experiences totaling 6-8 hours of academic credit where 40 clock hours on location equals one hour of credit. Ideally each practicum should be based on a criminal justice afflicted agency (court, probation office, correctional facility, local police station or sheriff's department, etc.), which specialized in some aspect of the criminal justice system. Ideally an on-site supervisor with an appropriate degree or license will supervise the student's practicum. Prereq: SOC 101, 202, 210, CRJ 201 and upper division status.
Explore the beautiful Riviera Maya with fantastic cities such as Uxmal, Chichen Itzá and the gorgeous city of Mérida. Learn from the indigenous Maya people about their culture, traditions, and ancient history. Become acquainted with their art forms in order to appreciate the beauty of these people while reflecting on our faith. Do homework on the Caribean beach, enjoy breathtaking views, dine at exquisite and tasty restaurants and discover vibrant markets. Leave the classroom behind. Learn in a new way under the sun. Meets the general education global foundations requirement.
The purpose of this course is to explore race and poverty issues that impact the classroom environment. Candidates will search for effective strategies to better meet the needs of underserved populations. The hidden rules of economic class and characteristics of generational poverty will be studied, with emphasis on the impact this has on instruction. Students will spend time assisting in a classroom which serves a high minority and low socioeconomic population. This course meets the general education global foundations requirement. Prerequisite: EDUC 101. (Offered every Interterm.) IN18 - $60 Fee
African American History I (1492-1860) explores the history of American slavery from its beginnings in the West Indies through colonization and up to the Civil War. The course examines the Atlantic slave trade (until its abolition in 1808), domestic slavery in America, the political and ideological divide within America (during this time period) over the issue of slavery, and the efforts of American and British abolitionists to end slavery.
African American History II (1860-1970) examines the halting progress Americans made during the 100 years between the Emancipation Proclamation and the civil rights legislation of the 1960's. Students consider the perspective of significant American civil rights activists, including W. E. B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin, Mary Church Terrell, Anna Julia Cooper, Marcus Garvey, A. Philip Randolph, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr.
African American History I (1492-1860) explores the history of American slavery from its beginnings in the West Indies through colonization and up to the Civil War. The course examines the Atlantic slave trade (until its abolition in 1808), domestic slavery in America, the political and ideological divide within America (during this time period) over the issue of slavery, and the efforts of American and British abolitionists to end slavery.
African American History II (1860-1970) examines the halting progress Americans made during the 100 years between the Emancipation Proclamation and the civil rights legislation of the 1960's. Students consider the perspective of significant American civil rights activists, including W. E. B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin, Mary Church Terrell, Anna Julia Cooper, Marcus Garvey, A. Philip Randolph, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr.
This course is an introduction to the study of criminal law in the United States, and does not cover any specific federal or state law. Topics include the reliance of U.S. law on the Constitution and peripherally on the Declaration of Independence, the relationship of criminal law to civil law, U.S. criminal law and its relation to British common law, principles of criminal law, principles of criminal liability, complicity, inchoate crimes, defenses, justifications and excuses, crimes against persons, crimes against property, crimes against public order, and crimes against the state. Prerequisite: CRJ 201. (Offered every third year.)
It is the goal of this course to devlop a greater understanding of the complexities of the law enforcement function-its intricacies and diversity. This will be done through a thoughtful consideration of the structure and functions of law enforcement and through exploring the topics of police and police functions. Prerequisites: CRJS 201 and SOCI 101. (Offered spring semester of every third year.)
This class will introduce students to a critical study of corrections-the institutionalized system through which society incarcerates or otherwise punishes and supervisers individuals identified as criminals. The course will consider the correctional system, with particular attention to the social forces that shape and are shaped by corrections. The course will focus on models and trends in corrections with application for both understanding society and preparation for practice. Prerequisites: CRJS 201 and SOCI 101. (Offered spring semester of every third year.)
Course content focuses upon basic concepts and operations in descriptive and inferential statistics. The areas of study will include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, correlation and regression analysis, and various tests of significance using both parametric and nonparametric procedures. Cross listed with SOCI and SCWK 202. Meets quantitative reasoning requirement. (Offered every semester.)
A study of basic concepts and operations in descriptive and inferential statistics. The areas of study will include graphic representations, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, and various significant tests of relationship, including measures of association, correlation, linear relationship, and means tests. This course includes an introduction to multivariate statistics and non-parametrics. Cross listed with PSYC and SOCI202. Meets Quantitative Reasoning requirement. (Offered every semester.)

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Career Opportunities

  • Police Officer
  • Correctional Officer
  • Detective
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