Biology Major

Courses

Visit the Online Undergraduate Catalog for an explanation of graduation requirements.

The biology major requires 32 credits of biology and eight credits of chemistry. It is strongly recommended that all biology majors take at least one semester of mathematics, statistics, computer science, physical science, or physics. The biology major leads to a bachelor of arts degree.

Biology Major Courses

BIOL110 General Biology I (4 Credits)
This course deals with the basic principles of biology. Consideration is given to cell biology and structural and functional organization of plants and animals. Principles of reproduction, genetics, and ecology are introduced as well as a brief survey of the kingdoms of living organisms. Beginning course for all biology majors. (Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.) (Offered fall semester.)
CHEM111 General Chemistry I (4 Credits)
Basic principles of chemical reactions and descriptive chemistry are integrated in terms of atomic structure, bonding theory, molecular geometry, reaction rates, equilibrium, and thermodynamics. (Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.) (Offered fall semester.)
BIOL112 General Biology II (4 Credits)
This course is a continuation of BIO 110 and emphasizes the diversity, ecology, structure and function of animals. The course will survey the animal kingdom and discuss adaptations for homeostasis, reproduction and interaction with the environment. Topics also include brief examination of community and ecosystem biology with an emphasis on sustainability and stewardship. (Three hours lectrure and two hours lab per week.) Prerequisite: BIOL 110 recommended. (Offered spring semester.)
CHEM112 General Chemistry II (4 Credits)
Basic principles of chemical reactions and descriptive chemistry are integrated in terms of the periodic table, atomic structure, bond types, molecular geometry, reaction rates, and thermodynamics. (Three lecture hours and three hours lab per week.) (Offered fall and spring semesters respectively.)
BIOL305 Genetics (4 Credits)
The facts of heredity; reproduction and development; the mechanism of heredity; hybridization and Mendel's laws; heredity in man and in its broader social applications. Recommended for all biology majors and required of all biology majors in secondary education. (Two hours lecture and four hours lab per week.) Prerequisite: BIO 110 and 112. (Offered spring semester.)
BIOL360 Microbiology (4 Credits)
Behavior and activity of microorganisms more or less common in the natural environment. Special attention given to the physiology of bacteria. Includes concepts of immunology and epidemiology. Required of all biology majors in secondary education and all pre-med and med-tech students. (Two hours lecture and four hours lab per week.) Prerequisite: BIO 110, 112, CHM 112, or permission of instructor. (Offered fall semester.)
BIOL370 Basic Ecology (4 Credits)
BIOL410 Seminar in Biology (2 Credits)
Reading and discussion assignments for the biology major dealing with recent biology research and advancement. Special projects and problems may be done on an individual basis. Offered each spring to be taken by all biology majors during their senior year. Secondary education majors in biology and pre-med-tech biology majors should take this course during their junior year. Meets the general education writing intensive requirement. Prerequisite: If taken for credit, 16 hours of previous biology. Anyone expecting to major in the Department may participate without credit. (Offered spring semester.)
Choose PSYC202/SOCI202 - Choose PSYC202 or SOCI202 (Courses Required: 1)
PSYC202 Statistics (3 Credits)
Course content focuses upon basic concepts and operations in descriptive and inferential statistics. The areas of study will include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, correlation and regression analysis, and various tests of significance using both parametric and nonparametric procedures. Cross listed with SOCI and SCWK 202. Meets quantitative reasoning requirement. (Offered every semester.)
SOCI202 Statistics (3 Credits)
A study of basic concepts and operations in descriptive and inferential statistics. The areas of study will include graphic representations, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, and various significant tests of relationship, including measures of association, correlation, linear relationship, and means tests. This course includes an introduction to multivariate statistics and non-parametrics. Cross listed with PSYC and SCWK 202. Meets Quantitative Reasoning requirement. (Offered every semester.)
Biology Electives - Select 10 credits from three of the four groups. (Credits Required: 10.00) (Courses Required: 3)
Choose One - Field Biology Courses
BIOL215 Survey/Plant Kingdom (Taxonomy) (4 Credits)
In this course the major emphasis is on a survey of the vascular plants and common families of flowering plants. Topics included are principles of flowering plant taxonomy, mechanisms of adaptation and plant ecology. (Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.) Prerequisite: BIO 110, 112 or permission of instructor. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
BIOL263 Environmental Topics Seminar (2 Credits)
This seminar will be based on a central theme each semester. Topics will range from Wetland Ecology to Forestry. Students will be introduced to the scientific literature relating to the semester's topic and will be expected to conduct literature reviews, provide written outlines and oral reports to the class. A student may apply one lower division and one upper division topic toward a major in environmental biology. Prerequisite: BIO 110 and 112 or permission of instructor. (Offered irregularly.)
BIOL265 Environmental Issues (4 Credits)
Through an introduction of basic concepts underlying the environmental sciences, this course is designed to facilitate the integration of Christian philosophy and an ethic of environmental stewardship. Subject matter will include fundamentals and practical applications of the sciences in relation to biodiversity, domestic and solid waste management, nuclear power and fossil fuel for energy, global climate change, water resource management and populations issues. (Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.) Prerequisite: BIO 110, 112, CHM 111, PHY 120C or permission of instructor. (Offered irregularly)
BIOL300 Field Biology (4 Credits)
Fieldwork will involve identification of the common plants and animals and consideration of ecological principles (e.g., succession, etc.) as seen in the field. Field trips will be made to various ecosystems. Prerequisite: BIO 110, 112, 115 or permission of instructor. (Offered irregularly)
BIOL363 Environmental Topics Seminar (2 Credits)
This seminar will be based on a central theme each semester. Topics will range from Wetland Ecology to Forestry. Students will be introduced to the scientific literature relating to the semester's topic and will be expected to conduct literature reviews, provide written outlines and oral reports to the class. A student may apply one lower division and one upper division topic toward a major in environmental biology. Prerequisite: BIO 110, 112, 115, 215, and CHM 112 or permission of instructor. (Offered irregularly.)
BIOL365 Environmental Law & Policy (3 Credits)
A study of legislation and implementing regulatory bodies dealing with U.S. and international policy. Students will gain a balanced, yet critical, account of how regulation is carried out, and the effect of policitical forces. Issues of general interest (e.g., solid waste, water, and air quality) are explored, as are emerging issues such as environmental waste at nuclear weapons facilities and political problems inherent in protecting biodiversity. The crisis of regulatory capacity in the U.S., which has developed in the environmental field since 1970, including deficiencies in institutional and policy design are also examined.
Choose One - Anatomical Biology Courses
BIOL245 Human Anatomy and Physiol (4 Credits)
This course is designed to deal with all the human body systems as to structure and function. Material covered is intended for those planning to teach biology in high school or enter the allied health professions, and to meet the needs of students majoring in physical education. Required of all physical education majors and biology majors in secondary education. (Two lectures and two two-hour labs per week.) (Offered fall semester)
BIOL309 Comparative Anatomy (4 Credits)
This will be a study of the similarities of anatomy and phylogenetic relationships of major vertebrate groups. Specifically, it will compare phylogeny, ontogeny, and morphology in groups ranging from protochordates to highly derived vertebrates. It will examine structure of anatomical features, emphasizing how anatomy relates to function including comparisons of specialized features in organisms adapted to different conditions. Laboratories will involve detailed dissections. Prerequisite: BIO110, 112. (Offered spring semester of odd calendar years.)
BIOL330 Developmental Biology (4 Credits)
This course covers the cellular and molecular processes involved in generating an embryo, in creating various tissues and organs, and the effect of external stimuli on development. Topics include: genome structure, gene expression and regulation, cell cycle control, pattern formation, signal transduction, gametogenesis, organogenesis, and methods used in studying developmental biology. Prerequsite: BIO110, 112. (Offered spring semester of odd calendar years.)
BIOL345 Human Anatomy and Physiol (4 Credits)
A continuation of BIO 245. (Two hours lecture and four hours lab per week.) Prerequisite: BIO 245. (Offered spring semester.)
Choose One - Cellular?Molecular Biology
BIOL314 Biochemistry I (4 Credits)
This course is a survey of the chemical reactions in living systems. The general biochemistry including a detailed look at DNA, transcription, translation, protein synthesis, lipid metabolism (e.g., cholesterol synthesie) and amino acide and nucleic acid metabolism will be studied. (Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week.) Cross listed with CHM 314. Prerequisite: CHM 201 or concurrent enrollment. (Offered fall semester.)
CHEM314 Biochemistry I (4 Credits)
This course is a survey of the chemical reactions in living systems. The general biochemistry including a detailed look at DNA, transcription, translation, protein synthesis, lipid metabolism (e.g., cholesterol synthesie) and amino acide and nucleic acid metabolism will be studied. (Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week.) Cross listed with BIO 314. Prerequisite: CHM 201 or concurrent enrollment. (Offered fall semester.)
BIOL340 Cell Biology (4 Credits)
Studies the structure and function of the cell, while examining the highly significant and diversified roles that cells play in living organisms. Includes information about major macromolecules, organelles and their functions, such as protein synthesis, cellular respiration, replication, and characteristics of different type cells. Lab includes biotechnological and biochemical experiments. (Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week.) Prerequisite: BIO 110, 112 and CHM 112. CHM 201 recommended. (Offered spring semester.)
BIOL341 Instrumental Analysis (4 Credits)
This course covers the major types of instrumentation utilized in chemistry, biology and physics by providing "hands-on" experience as well as emphasizing the underlying principles. (Three hours of lecture and three hours lab per week.) Cross listed with CHM 342/PHY 342. Prerequisite: CHM 112, PHY 120C, CHM 201 recommended. (Offered spring semester of odd calendar years.)
CHEM342 Instrumental Analysis (4 Credits)
This course covers the major types of instrumentation utilized in Chemistry, Biology and Physics by providing "hands-on" experience as well as emphasizing the underlying principles. (Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week.) Cross listed with BIO 341/PHY 342. Prerequisite: CHM 112, AND PHY 120. Chemistry 201 recommended. (Offered spring semester of odd calendar years.)
Choose One - Self-Directed Courses/Experiences
BIOL351 Biological Problems (2 Credits)
A project course. An opportunity for students to make a beginning at research work or learn skills in areas such as cell/molecular biology, plant taxonomy, biological illustrating, or micro technique. The assigned project will be related to major interest. Prerequisite: Major in biology. (Offered irregularly.)
BIOL390 Readings/Biology (2 Credits)
Selected readings chosen by student and instructor.
BIOL395 Biology Internship (1 Credit)
Biology majors may earn a maximum of eight semester credits while engaged in a practicum experience related to their specific field of interest. The potentials for the practicum are unlimited. The practicum may involve work or volunteer service in any biologically related career. Each practicum will need the approval of the Department chair. It is the student's responsibility to initiate a request for the practicum, suggest prospective openings, and declare in writing their interests and goals for each practicum. The practicum will be taken for pass/fail credit unless the student formally requests a letter grade before attempting the practicum.
BIOL405 Biology Practicum (1 Credit)
Biology majors may earn a maximum of eight semester credits while engaged in a practicum experience related to their specific field of interest. The potentials for the practicum are unlimited. The practicum may involve work or volunteer service in any biologically related career. Each practicum will need the approval of the Department chair. It is the student's responsibility to initiate a request for the practicum, suggest prospective openings, and declare in writing their interests and goals for each practicum. The practicum will be taken for pass/fail credit unless the student formally requests a letter grade before attempting the practicum.

Biology Major Partner Programs

Engineering Dual Degree Program

According to the U.S. Department of Labor statistics, engineering is projected to be one of the top five areas of employment for the next decade. If you have been prepared by your high school education in writing, communications, mathematics and science, you should be ready to move into the college level courses. You will have to study a lot, but anything worth doing requires some effort. The payback occurs in career satisfaction. The engineering profession ranks in the upper 15% among the 250 types of work endeavors.

Dual Degree with University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

The Engineering School at UIUC ranks number 6 overall in the United States, according to U.S. News and World Report. The Dual Degree (3-2) program results in a Bachelor of Arts in Physics, Chemistry or Biology from Greenville College and a Bachelor of Science in Engineering from UIUC.

Dual Degree with Washington University in St. Louis

The Engineering School at Washington University in St. Louis is ranked number 14 overall according to U.S. News and Word Report. This Dual Degree (3-2) program results in a Bachelor of Arts in Physics, Chemistry or Biology from Greenville College and a Bachelor of Science in Engineering from Washington University.

The following degree plan provides a glimpse of what your schedule may look like as you complete this program:

Benefits of the 3/2 Program

  1. Successful completion of Greenville's engineering program, with an appropriate GPA, guarantees admission to top quality engineering schools for the remaining two years.
  2. Receive personal attention in the math and physics courses that provide the backbone of any engineering program.
  3. Gain exposure to the many engineering opportunities before making a final commitment to a specific field.
  4. Remain flexible in your career options by starting with the practical, broad- natured pre-engineering courses that prepares one for many fields.
  5. Obtain two degrees -- a liberal arts degree in addition to an engineering degree. Employers seek graduates with a broad background to better adapt to our constantly changing society.
  6. Spend three years at a campus where Christian principles and values are taught and practiced.

International Students

Greenville College works alongside Yenching Elite Education as our premier partner in China for recruiting qualified Chinese students into its engineering dual-degree program. Yenching Elite Education focuses on providing access to our “Pathways Programs” designed to assist Chinese students upon graduating from high school. Students completing a one-year Pathway Program enjoy a curriculum focused on English language development and additional coursework to prepare them for attending the school’s four-year degree program. Yenching Elite Education also collaborates to find top students interested in pursuing our Engineering Dual Degree (3:2) partnerships with University of Illinois and Washington University

Engineering Triple Degree Program

Triple Degree (3-3) program graduates will receive a Bachelor of Arts in Physics, Chemistry or Biology from Greenville College, a Bachelor of Science in Engineering and a Master of Science in Engineering from Washington University. The GRE is not required for admission. Generous scholarships are available for both domestic and international students including 50 percent of tuition during the first year, 55 percent of tuition during the second year and 60 percent of tuition during the third and final year of a student's enrollment at Washington University.

Nursing Partnerships

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Nursing Partnership (Bachelor's Degree Partnership)

The Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Nursing has a nursing program partnership with Greenville College to facilitate select students to complete an accelerated, [three-year bachelor's in biology from GU followed by an accelerated bachelor's in nursing from SIUE. They can complete both degrees in as little as 4-1/2 years.] This is not the only way. Students can complete the full four years at Greenville as well. SIUE offers access to high-fidelity mannequins through their simulation laboratory, as well as an avatar-based scenario program that students can use after graduation. SIUE has allotted five guaranteed seats per year for eligible students to be granted admission to their nursing program. SIUE’s nursing programs are accredited through the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE).

Goldfarb School of Nursing Partnership (Bachelor's Degree Partnership)

Offers GU students a track to transfer in to their school bringing 54 credits of transfer work and allowing students to complete the BSN degree in five terms. It is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) http://www.aacn.nche.edu/ccne-accreditation.

Kaskaskia College Nursing Program (Associate Degree of Nursing Program Partnership)

The Associate Degree Nursing Program is fully accredited by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation and by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing, Inc. The Associate Degree Nursing Program prepares recipients to become Registered Nurses (RNs).

Saint Louis University School of Nursing Partnership (Bachelor's Degree Partnership)

The Saint Louis University School of Nursing was founded in 1928 and has programs designed to allow students to obtain a bachelor, master, or doctoral degree. Programs are accredited through the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). Our partnership agreement is for the 12-month accelerated BSN program, so students will graduate from Greenville and then attend the SLU program afterwards. SLU has reserved three seats for Greenville College students that meet admission criteria.

St. John's College Department of Nursing Partnership (Bachelor's Degree Partnership)

St. Johns College originated as St. John's Hospital School of Nursing in 1886 and is the oldest Catholic hospital nursing school in the United States. It reorganized in 1991, establishing its present form. It is accredited by North Central Association of Colleges and Schools and the Illinois Department of Professional Regulation to grant the Baccalaureate in Nursing (BSN). The nursing programs are accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN).

The majority of the clinical training is at St. John's Hospital, which is also affiliated with the SIU Medical School, whose library facilities they share. St. John's College has its own well-equipped nursing training laboratories. The agreement with St. John’s College is for a 3-2 program set-up which will result in you receiving both a BA from Greenville in Biology and a BSN from St. John’s. St John’s College has two seats each year in their program that have been reserved for eligible Greenville University students.

Biology Major Pre-Professional Programs

Pre-Dietetics and Pre-Pharmacy

No Description Available.

Pre-Medical Technology

No Description Available.

Pre-Medicine

The Medical Career

Students interested in serving God and the world through the medical profession typically get specialty training to become a physician through either the doctor of medicine (MD) or a doctor of osteopathy (DO) degrees. Both training methods have the same licensing priveleges.

Enjoyment of problem solving is a must, for the good physician is foremost a problem solver. One must also be able to delay gratification for many years, since the average time of training from undergraduate through residency is 11-13 years. The rewards, however, are many for those willing to commit to the rigors of training.

Greenville gives the student a good start in the training process, through an educational program with proven success, and a faculty that supports and cares for the development of the whole student. Greenville is uniquely equipped to prepare you for a meaningful life and success in your career. An indication of the quality of Greenville's program is that, of those Pre-Med students graduating in the past 15 years, at least a half dozen have joined other alumni who are now medical school faculty members, including one who is a founding editor of the Journal of Maternal & Fetal Medicine.

The Greenville Education

Greenville College has had success preparing students for admission into medical school because of the following:

  • Strong academic preparation. In the laboratory, students are expected to use major pieces of equipment often found only at much larger institutions and reserved for graduate programs. The college has a strong and balanced science and math division. The pre-professional student takes courses designed for majors bound for graduate school in each of the disciplines. There are no abbreviated courses simply to meet minimum professional school requirements.
  • Supportive faculty. Faculty will take a personal interest in the student, both in and out of the classroom. Upper division classes are small, with much individual instruction. The pre-med advisor takes students to medical school seminars to learn about current admission procedures.
  • Personal growth. The college strives to educate servant leaders, encouraging participation in activities that will aid the student in understanding and preparing for a lifetime in a service profession.
  • A recent report of the "Council on Medical Education" encouraged medical schools to look for the broadly educated applicant. Greenville's liberal arts tradition gives that broad perspective for which medical schools are looking.

Medical Admission Requirements

Most pre-med students major in either biology, chemistry, or both. However, no particular major is necessary for entrance into medical school. The core of courses required are:

  • 1 year of biology
  • 1 year of general chemistry
  • 1 year of organic chemistry
  • Biochemistry recommended
  • Calculus
  • 1 year of physics
  • General education courses that give a broad understanding of life
  • Successful scores on the MCAT (medical college admission test)
  • Letters of recommendation
  • A strong GPA

We strongly recommend more biology; thus the biology major is a good preparation for entrance into medical school. Further courses which prove helpful are cell biology, microbiology, genetics, general physiology, and vertebrate morphogenesis. All of the courses recommended or required have successfully prepared many students in the past for medical schools all over the country.

Greenville's composite letter of recommendation is much appreciated by medical schools. The composite letter is written by professors who know the students personally and have counseled them in their health career. It is compiled by the science division and sent to each of the medical schools to which the student wishes to apply.

Greenville College BA in Biology degree with Pre-Med emphasis

In addition to the courses listed under medical admission requirements, the student will need to complete a biology major and general education requirements to graduate from Greenville College. Courses not previously listed that are required for the biology major are botany, cell biology, and senior seminar. A total of 32 credits are required for a major in biology. General education requirements for graduation in addition to previously listed courses are:

  • 1 year of English
  • 1 course in communication
  • 1 course in philosophy
  • 1 course in behavioral science
  • 1 course in history, and an additional history or behavioral science course
  • 1 course in fine arts
  • Language proficiency or equivalent to 3 semesters of college foreign language
  • 2 designated religion classes (Bible and Culture, Faith and Learning)
  • 4 credits in physical education

Accreditation

Greenville College is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, as well as several other academic affiliations for teachers.

Pre-Optometry

No Description Available.

Career Opportunities

  • Doctor
  • Nurse
  • Food & Drug Inspector
  • Forensic Scientist
  • Botanist
  • Wildlife Biologist
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